Facilitator's Guide

Assess

Assessing Your Community and School

This activity describes a detailed step-by-step process for broadly assessing and monitoring children’s living and learning conditions in communities of cities and towns of different sizes, as well as in rural communities. The Convention on the Rights of the Child served as the framework for determining what range of conditions should be assessed. Data can be collected and analyzed by community residents to identify priority areas for action to enhance living conditions for children. The findings from this assessment can then be used by community residents for advocacy purposes with local authorities or as a guide for their own direct actions to improve their community.

The methodology and tools are also valuable for providing municipal government decision-makers with more small-scale geographic data on children, and on a much greater range of dimensions than is typically available for city-level planning for children. The different ways that municipalities can use the community and governance assessment tools for citywide data collection can be found in the Child Friendly Cities Facilitator’s Guide (EnglishEspañol).

Key Questions

  1. What do children, youth and adults think about their schools and communities?
  2. What are the current conditions of schools and communities for children and youth?
  3. Why are some conditions for children’s rights being fulfilled, while others are not?
  4. Which conditions are priorities for improvement?
  • Children voting their opinions in Bhavnagar City, India
  • Parents scoring their opinions on large charts in the Sudan
  • Children voting as a game with movement in India
  • Parents scoring their opinions with colored index cards in the Philippines
  • Children scoring their opinions with computers on a bus in India
  • Young people voting for their priorities in Bhavnagar City, India
  • Young facilitator in Haiti summarizing the results in a child friendly graphic
  • Example of assessment booklets and image cards used in the Philippines
  • A child facilitator tallying the responses in Mumbai, India
  • Children discussing their opinions in Ordu, Turkey

Supporting Tools

  • 3.01 Booklet Tool Instructions
    Instructions on how to format the booklet assessment tool, which is recommended for children aged 7-9 and for participants with low literacy levels.
  • 3.02 Booklet Tool Template
    One page of the booklet tool, which can be downloaded, saved, and adapted for local use to construct your own assessment instruments.
  • 3.03 Survey Tool Instructions
    Instructions on how to format the survey assessment tool, which is recommended for children and youth aged 10+ and for participants who can read.
  • 3.04 Survey Tool Template
    One page of the survey tool, which can be downloaded, saved, and adapted for local use to construct your own assessment instruments.
  • 3.05 Comprehensive Tool Instructions
    Instructions on how to format the comprehensive assessment tool, which is recommended for going door-to-door and interviewing individuals.
  • 3.06 Comprehensive Tool Template
    One page of the comprehensive tool, which can be downloaded, saved, and adapted for local use to construct your own assessment instruments.
  • 3.07 Community Assessment Items
    Tables that identify the assessment images, topics, items, and statements for the different groups included in the assessment of communities.
  • 3.08 Community Assessment Images
    A .zip file that contains individual .jpg files of all the assessment images for communities that can be used to construct your own assessment instruments.
  • 3.09 Community Assessment Image Cards
    A .zip file that contains all the assessment image cards for communities, which are used to tally the results.
  • 3.10 Community Assessment Tools (English)
    A .zip file that contains all of the assessment tools for the different age groups in English, if groups want to use all of the existing assessment items for communities without adapting them.
  • 3.11 Community Assessment Tools (blank)
    A .zip file that contains all of assessment tools for the different age groups that can be used to construct the assessment instruments for communities in different languages.
  • 3.12 School Assessment Items
    Tables that identify the assessment images, topics, items, and statements for the different groups included in the assessment of schools.
  • 3.13 School Assessment Images
    A .zip file that contains individual .jpg files of all the assessment images for schools that can be used to construct your own assessment instruments.
  • 3.14 School Assessment Image Cards
    A .zip file that contains all the assessment image cards for schools, which are used to tally the results.
  • 3.15 School Assessment Tools (English)
    A .zip file that contains all of the assessment tools for the different age groups in English, if groups want to use all of the existing assessment items for schools without adapting them.
  • 3.16 School Assessment Tools (blank)
    A .zip file that contains all of assessment tools for the different age groups that can be used to construct the assessment instruments for schools in different languages.
  • 3.17 Tips for Modifying Activity 3
    A guidance document on how to modify the graphic design of the assessment tools, and recommendations on how to alter some of the steps for different age groups and cultures.
  • 3.18 Results Chart Template
    A chart that describes the different columns and rows that should be replicated onto large paper to tally the assessment results as a group.
  • 3.19 Results Chart Example
    An example of the results chart using hypothetical data.
  • 3.20 Gender Results Chart Template
    An example of how the results chart can be modified to understand the unique assessment results for boys and girls, or men and women.
  • 3.21 Discussion Guide
    A list of questions for each assessment item that can be used as a guide for small or large group discussions about the results.
  • 3.22 Activity 3 Reflection
    Facilitators and participants can use these questions as a guide to reflect upon the strengths and weaknesses of the activity, what was accomplished, and what was learned.